How to get a promotion – A Promotion framework

How to get a promotion

1. Use a framework
2. Know Your Role
3. Identify Pathways
4. Create a current state assessment
5. Create a Plan
6. Be Flexible (get feedback)
7. Network
8. Have a contingency plan
9. Reflect
10. Know your timeframes

Want more?  Watch the 10 steps here and download the book for FREE.

 

Want to get ahead of the pack and stand in your pack? Want to lead the pack and get that promotion this year? Then book a complimentary consult today to get started. 

Want to get a promotion?

Use a framework
The best approach is to really have a structured framework that you’re working towards which you can read more in my book “I’m Ready Now! – A Guide for Getting a Promotion”.  This framework involved 10 steps to get that promotion.

Know Your Role
Know exactly what position or positions you’re going for and why you want to go for them.

Pathways
Identify your pathways to a promotion.

Is your company very focused on formal pathways where you need to go to several interviews or is it better to network away into a promotion or maybe a combination?

Have a look at the last two years of promotions into the roles that you want to go into and see how people have successfully got into those roles.

Don’t pursue pathways that are not proven to be ones that actually work for people to get into those jobs.

Current State Assessment
Do a current state assessment so look around your environment and work out who the key influencers, stakeholders, and decision makers are in the promotion process. Make sure that you’ve got those people onboard and working for you in terms of getting a promotion.

Create A Plan
The next thing is to do is actually create a plan. Sit down and work through a plan on how you’re actually going to spend your time working towards a promotion and give yourself a timeframe of three to six months and tasks that you’re going to pursue every single week to get there.

Be Flexible
The next step is to really monitor, revise, adapt your plan and check in. Check in weekly to see how your plan is going and if you’re progressing well to that plan. Also, give yourself a timeframe to say when you’re going to stop pursuing a promotion in your current department or workplace and to start looking outside your organisation.

Network
I also really recommend within that plan to make sure that you are doing some level of external networking outside your existing department or company so that you have different options open if a promotion does not become available to you in the timeframe you want so that you can pursue a promotion somewhere else.

Have a contingency plan
Have contingency options in place so you don’t get a promotion in six months you know what you’ll do instead?

What is your next strategy?

Reflection
If you do end up getting that promotion take some time to reflect, appreciate and take learnings on what you would do or repeat next time you’re going for a promotion.

Don’t Stop
The other tip I would give you is as soon as you get in your  next promotion, start working towards your next one.

Understand your timeframes
If you haven’t been working towards a promotion and now you’ve started it generally takes a minimum of 6 to 12 if not 18 months to make that promotion happen. Particularly if you have to do it through informal ways such as networking as these networks can take a long time to build.

Those are my top tips for getting a promotion. I hope they really help you progress. Good luck with your career and as I said I’m Beatrice Crocker. If you want more download the book for free. It really helps layout all this information in detail and I created it to help women progress because we don’t always get access to this information.

Want to work with me, book a complimentary consult today to get started.   

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4 actionable steps to build your confidence today

4 actionable steps to take to build confidence today 

1. Have Perspective. You’re not alone.
2. Do small things. What is one thing you can do today to increase your confidence?
3. Find an accidental mentor.
4. Adopt an enduring desire for change

Want more?

Click the picture to watch the back story.

Want to get ahead of the pack and stand in your power?

Want to lead your pack and get that promotion this year?

Want to take control and get results?

Want exclusive support?

Then book a complimentary consult today to get started.

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5 ways to get the respect you deserve in every meeting you run

1. Agree ways of working and behaving for every meeting
2. Keep the agenda narrow to 2-3 topics only
3. Keep the attendee list as small as possible
4. When people behave badly and refuse to change, remove them from the attendee list (and get instant respect from everyone else)
5. Ask for feedback

Want more?  Watch the back story by clicking the linked picture below or continue reading below.

Want to get ahead of the pack and stand in your power? Want to lead your pack and get that promotion this year? Then book a complimentary consult with me today to get started. 

The backstory:
I was recently running a series of meetings last year where behaviours were less than ideal. These included people talking over each other, not listening to each other, not respecting my role as chair, not respecting people who were presenting — so just talking over, interrupting, asking questions at the wrong time, making personal attacks, being very competitive, being very negative, and just outright rude behaviours.

As much as I could have blamed the people  for their “bad behaviours”  I took responsibility as the chair and really looked at what I could control within the meeting.

Why were things going so wrong?

What was contributing to the behaviours?

What had happened is that over many months the agenda had become bloated. The invite list had tripled and the attendees really had a different understanding what the meeting was for compared to myself or the original members of the meeting. This meant people came in confused, felt unheard, felt that their issues were undervalued. Because they weren’t given space on the agenda  they would fight to create that space.

So, I just took a step back and I said, “Well, I have to address these issues.”

What I did next is I relaunched the meeting and reframed the agenda of the meeting to be much narrower and clearer. I reduced the number of topics and agenda items from 12 to 3.   Set really strict times for each agenda item. And allowed specific time for Q & A and discussion and we would go around the room to make sure that everyone was heard and prompt them to ask questions or to get feedback.

So the meeting went from something that was very loose to something super-structured. And I did sort of hesitate a little bit on that, thinking that that was going to be too structured. I also reduced the invite list by about 70%.  And, obviously, that was controversial because some people didn’t want to be left out of the meeting. But for me the point of the meeting was to achieve certain objectives for which only certain people needed to attend to do so.

I also went and spoke individually to some of the people in the meeting and asked for their support for my role as chair and also to support better behaviours in the meeting of each other and themselves. I asked for respect when people were speaking, rather than talking over them and bringing up old war stories to attack people with.

Old stories don’t let us create a new story.

The most powerful thing I did was relaunch the forum and complete an exercise in that first forum on how do we want to feel and make others feel in our meeting. That really was about instilling responsibility for behaviour amongst everyone, not just myself as a chair or the leaders in the room but everyone who was attending.

The impact of these actions was really to take a ramshackle, aggressive meeting, where people felt anxious attending it, to a well run, respectful, enjoyable, easy meeting that people wanted to attend, an easy meeting for me to run, and a very easy meeting for people to speak up in.

And I had feedback from people saying, “I was beginning to feel anxious coming to that meeting, and now I feel like I really want to go to that meeting. And I’m not worried any more.”

Don’t be afraid to relaunch a meeting. Don’t be afraid to take people out of the meeting if they’re no longer suitable to attend, and the other thing I would say is take the time to discuss what behaviours you want in the meeting.

This is a great way to make everyone feel included, make everyone part of the story of that meeting, and also to take the temperature down if things are out of control.

I hope you found this really useful. My name is Beatrice Crocker, and I am the founder and lead coach of I’m Ready Now! Coaching and I am an executive coach that works with  women who work in traditionally male dominated fields or have reached that job level where there are very few women in the peer group.

I want you to find more purpose, meaning, leadership and growth in your career. I’m passionate about helping women to be seen living their true purpose and who want to radiantly embrace their lives, find more meaning, purpose, and growth in their career.

If you’d like to work with me, book a complimentary consult today to get started.   

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Following your heart opens up your world to possibility

What is the biggest learning you had this week?

If you follow me on Linkedin, Facebook or Insta, you will have noticed I sometimes post a learning of the week. These learnings cover 3 areas – what I learnt about myself, what I learnt about other or society, what I learnt at work.

Here are some highlights from my notes over Dec-Jan:

  • People listen when you communicate a message in the way they need to hear it
  • Kindness is powerful
  • Following your heart opens your world to possibility
  • We all love to laugh
Following your heart opens up your world to possibility
Following your heart opens up your world to possibility

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What have you learnt this week at work, about others and about yourself?

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Why is everyone just so critical ? Second chances and letting relationships just evolve.

How quickly do you label a colleague, direct report, peer or boss an idiot?   After one or two stuff ups, poorly chosen words or a funny facial expression?

I remember a mentor of mine once saying: “Why are aussies SO critical all the time?”

It seems like any minor problem will be taken as sufficient reason to write someone off entirely.

The most rewarding relationships are those that we invest in, when we truly get to know someone under a lot of different conditions.

In 2017, I discovered how rewarding seeing past someone’s reputation was and taking the time to develop a strong relationship could be.  But it took TIME and openness from both sides.  It meant having open conversations about things that bothered me and it meant me being open to things that bothered him.  It was worth the effort.

Is there someone you have written off?

What would happen if you tried again to build a positive relationship?

What are you missing out on by being closed off to this person?

What are the differences between boundaries and letting relationships grow organically?

Are we just too critical?

 

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